Second Mona Lisa Touch Treatment

Yesterday was my second round of laser treatment for vaginal atrophy. The procedure was much like the first but I was a lot more relaxed now that I’d been through the whole routine before.

The doctor asked about my response to the first treatment. There’s no doubt that I’ve had good results. I’m much less dry and a lot more comfortable. I’m having what I think of as the toothache response, where you don’t appreciate how much something was bothering you until you find relief.

The observable differences after the first treatment included an end to leaking following urination. For me, this was enough to justify the cost, but the benefits included better vaginal lubrication and relief from the residual tension I hadn’t noticed my body had been holding in response to feeling like I had sand caught in my swimmers.

I was surprised to notice that having better vaginal lubrication also improved my libido. I suspect that my body, recognising that intercourse was likely to be painful, had shut down whatever part of the system makes me interested in sex. I also made the observation that my mood generally was much better. I had underestimated the impact of a poorly functioning vagina on my emotional state.

For the second treatment the doctor spent a bit more time on the entrance to my vagina and to the exterior labia. This is more uncomfortable than the internal treatment due to the increased nerve endings in this part of the body. I commented that the pain level was similar to having hair removed using wax strips and the doctor replied that this was a common observation. It stings, but not for long.

Post treatment I was advised to use sorbolene externally to reduce stinging during urination. I was very glad that I’d purchased some on the way home because ‘stinging’ turned out to be a painful burning sensation. The sorbolene relieved it instantly. If you’re having this treatment then it would be worth buying some in advance. I’d recommend finding plain sorbolene in a pump pack and avoiding anything with perfume or additives as this could irritate sensitive skin. A pump pack makes it easy to apply and you don’t have to worry about getting the lid back on.

My other tip would be to dress warmly on the top half of your body for your treatment sessions. For reasons I don’t understand, most gynaecologists wear suits and adjust the temperature control accordingly. This time around I was much more comfortable in a soft jumper, even though it was a fairly warm day.

My second treatment cost $350 with a $90 rebate, so I was $260 out of pocket. Given the improvement I’ve observed I consider it money well spent. I have one more treatment in a month’s time and then I will only need occasional top up treatments. There is no way of knowing how often I’ll require these and the doctor tells me that it varies from annually to every three months. I’m already certain that no matter how often I need them, it’s worth it.

I am also grateful to be in a position where we only need to cut back a bit of spending in a few places for this to be affordable. I am aware that for many, many women it will just be far too much money, particularly if the finances have already taken a huge hit following cancer treatment.

I’ve been spending the last month contemplating the fact that men can obtain viagra at a government subsidised price (at least in Australia, where I live) because there is recognition that erectile dysfunction is not just about the ability to maintain an erection. It’s also something that has significant mental health repercussions. How is vaginal atrophy any different?

I appreciate that there’s an argument for making treatment available to breast cancer survivors based on the same arguments used to justify government subsidised reconstruction, but I don’t think the subsidy should be restricted to us. Anyone having chemotherapy is at risk of early menopause and vaginal atrophy, not just those of us receiving treatment for breast cancer.

It’s also worth considering that all post menopausal women are at risk of this condition, regardless of their cancer status. As the doctor observed on my first visit, it’s only cultural attitudes that prevent us from treating this as a serious health issue. Why is that, and how can we shift those attitudes?¬†Why is it important for men to maintain sexual function, but not women?

The doctor also observed that sexual function is not the most important benefit of this treatment, which is saying something, considering how significant this benefit is for many women. Vaginal atrophy also predisposes women to a much higher rate of urinary tract infections, prolapse, urinary incontinence and just day-to-day discomfort.

I was pleased to see a current university study into the Mona Lisa Touch therapy. I’m hopeful that the results will validate what so many patients already know. This is a non pharmaceutical treatment with significant benefits and few side effects. It should be better known and more widely available at an affordable cost.

So far, I’m impressed. I’ll report back next month after my final treatment.

 

 

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