Getting doctors to take us seriously

I woke up this morning to news that a friend is in hospital with a burst appendix. This should not have happened.

She developed the characteristic pain associated with appendicitis last week and saw an after hours doctor. She was referred to a hospital for assessment where she was examined by another doctor who decided she didn’t need further treatment. She was not offered either ultrasound or a CT scans. She was sent home.

Her doctor accepted the word of the hospital doctor and continued to work with my friend to determine what was going on. There were tests. There was pain medication and ultimately a burst appendix. All this in spite of my friend repeatedly reporting acute abdominal pain.

I can’t help wondering if women reporting pain are treated differently to men reporting pain. This is not my only recent experience of this apparent bias.

My daughter has an unfortunate history of not being taken seriously by doctors, particularly with regard to pain. As her mother, I know that she is inclined to actually be rather stoic when it comes to pain. She does not exaggerate and she’s likely to wait a while before she resorts to pain medication. I know that if she says she is in pain she means it.

And yet, time and again she has had doctors dismiss her with a shrug of their shoulders and a suggestion that she should ‘just keep an eye on it’. This week she will have surgery on her finger. It has been causing problems for a couple of years now. It is always tender and if she bumps it against anything she experiences strong, stabbing pain on the underside of the nail bed. She has repeatedly told various doctors about the problem.

Finally my daughter encountered a freshly minted doctor, filling in at the practice she regularly attends. The locum was interested enough to send her for an MRI. What it revealed was a tumour. While currently likely to be benign, this type of tumour does have the potential to become cancerous. It needs to be removed.

My daughter is understandably angry. She’s not only had years of pain in the hand, she’s had it while working through a university degree and having to type on a daily basis. She’s had it in spite of several reports to doctors who seem to have just assumed she was over stating her pain, or displaying some kind of hypochondria.

Not only that, but this is just the most recent in a series of similar events where it has taken her two, three or four visits to different doctors before she finally finds someone prepared to take her seriously. In every single case there was a serious underlying medical condition that required treatment.

How does this happen? Are doctors’ surgeries so filled with over-reporting, attention-seeking women that the rest of us get tarred with the same brush?

My daughter wonders if she would have received better treatment if she had been a man, particularly a large, football-playing man. I think she would have. I think a doctor would have assumed that any man attending the surgery and reporting acute pain in his finger had something worthy of further investigation.

If you are a doctor and you are reading this then I would like to offer this piece of advice. Please do not assume. Your opinions about female patients might have some basis in fact and I allow for that. It could be that women actually are more inclined to exaggerate their symptoms or to seek medical attention when some over the counter pain relief and a bit of rest are all that is needed. Personally, I doubt this. It is inconsistent with my own experience but my personal experience is limited and perhaps you know better.

Still, here’s the thing, even if some women (or even most women) are inclined to this type of behaviour, many of us are not. Many of us are the type of people that wait to see a doctor and possibly wait a bit too long. When we arrive at your surgery seeking your help we’ve already given time and Panadol a go. We have already been ‘keeping an eye on it’ and that is why we are now seeking your help.

You might also like to keep in mind that we have a naturally higher pain threshold than men. There’s good science on this. So when we report pain it is likely to be more serious, not less.

I think it’s just possible that there is a long history of characterising women unfairly. We used to be treated for ‘hysteria’, a mysterious condition thought to be caused by our womb roaming our body and creating mood swings. In recent years the assumption that our menstrual cycle will result in strange and irrational behaviour every month has become so widely accepted that it now gets used as a criminal defence. The truth is that most of us manage to live our lives without turning into raging lunatics once a month.

Menopause is characterised by some as an onset of permanent mood swings that are as suddenly changeable as New Zealand weather patterns. Which is odd, given that I now keep company with a circle of post menopausal friends who clearly manage entire days, weeks and months of sensible behaviour.

Enough.

Women are not over emotional. We are not, by nature, moody, unreasonable, attention-seeking drama queens. Most of us are just like men in this regard; capable of experiencing the full spectrum of human emotions and expressing them in appropriate ways. The exceptions are just that. Getting doctors to understand this is not just about better bedside manner. It is about saving lives.

My daughter’s cyst could have become a tumour. My friends appendix has burst and she is now dealing with the risk of long term health consequences because of it. Head to any cancer forum and you will read story after story of women that were told a lump was nothing to worry about only to discover it was a tumour. We’re not making this stuff up!

As patients I think we also need to be aware that this bias exists. I wish it was as easy as saying to a doctor, ‘Do you think you might take me more seriously if I was a man with these symptoms?’ I am known to be what my husband politely refers to a a ‘forthright’ but even I would find this kind of comment too confrontational. There are gentler ways to achieve the same outcome.

Perhaps it would be a good idea if we enter a doctor’s surgery with a clear idea of what we want and refuse to leave until we get it. Being able to ask for a scan or some other form of diagnostic test can be difficult. We want to trust our medical professionals. We feel rude challenging their diagnosis.

I have found that it can be useful to frame this kind of request as a need for reassurance. This doesn’t challenge your doctor’s expertise. It can also be useful to ask your doctor to consider alternatives. Yes, a second opinion is an option but it is also both time consuming and expensive, and there is no guarantee that you’ll be treated any better by another doctor.

So here, in the interests of better health care, are my suggestions for questions to ask your doctor when you feel like you’re getting the ‘silly woman’ treatment:

I have been worried about this and I would really feel a lot better if I could have an x-ray (ultrasound, bone scan, blood test etc).

I know you don’t recommend having any kind of testing for this but I’d like one anyway.

May I please have a referral for an ultrasound? And if your doctor replies that they do not think you need one: I appreciate that but I would like one anyway.

What should I do if I still have the same symptoms in a couple of days? (Next week? Next month?)

What else might be causing this? 

None of these questions are rude or discourteous in any way. You’re just asking for what you want. Of course asking for what you want can feel like hard work in an environment where you know you might be dismissed as over reacting, simply because of your gender.

Which is precisely why I think we should all get a lot better at doing it.

 

 

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Why I don’t care about Cate Blanchett’s cosmetic surgery

 

It seems that it’s now impossible for me to go blog surfing without finding a rant about the pressure we’re also supposed to suffer as a consequence of fashion models and famous people looking fabulous. As a 55 year old woman I’m apparently also supposed to be angry about the lack of media representation for women of ‘a certain age’ and the pressure exerted upon me to stay looking younger. Pardon me while I scoff.

Most recently, a friend turning 50 was infuriated by the suggestion that Cate Blanchett may have had cosmetic surgery and botox injections. She was angry that women in the media and entertainment industries weren’t content to age naturally. She saw the actror’s refusal to confirm or deny as ‘an act of betrayal’. Really? I see it as none of my business.

I was also fortunate enough to see and Australian screening of ‘Miss Representation’, a wonderful movie about the distorted ways women are depicted in television, magazines and movies. It’s an inspirational film about how we need to fight back against unrealistic expectations of beauty and how we might overcome the bias against women in the media. The movie made some astute observations about the way female politicians are denigrated and the pressures young people feel. None of it was news to me. This subject has been covered before and while I’d recommend the movie, I still take issue with some of the content. It assumes my self-image will be affected by the media portrayal of women. I just don’t think this is always true.

I’ve never felt intimidated by those that rely upon their appearance to make a living. I’ve always assumed that the life of a high fashion model is a rigorous routine of exercise, dieting, avoiding any form of injury or blemish and constant anxiety over the limited time they’re likely to have a career. I know they suffer disproportionately from anorexia and bulimia.

Think you’ve got a body image problem? Imagine working in an industry where you’ll be ‘styled’ beyond a point where your Mum would recognise you and then ‘enhanced’ using photoshop. Extend your empathy to understanding what it must feel like for these women to constantly have their appearance auditioned and rejected.

The career of a fashion model is notoriously insecure and their working life is short. They might be lucky enough to have a fashionable ‘look’ for a season, only to find that they don’t have the same appeal the following year; the industry has moved on to another ‘look’. They can also expect to be hated by other women and dismissed as a mindless bimbo. Do I envy them? Not one bit.

Have I ever looked at a fashion model and wanted to look that way? Honestly? Never! I’ve always known that they were a tiny percentage of the population, a kind of genetic freak, and that old saying about walking a mile in someone’s shoes, even their ridiculously expensive and crippling designer shoes, holds true. Before I consider envying anyone I always try to imagine what it would be like to have the whole of their life, not just the bit that appeals to me.

How about the glamorous life of an actor? Financial insecurity is also a looming cloud and while a select few do manage to earn huge sums of money, most do not. This is an industry where fame certainly appears to require some talent (although not always) but where clever marketing, public popularity and box office bankability will also impact upon your success. If you’re a television or stage actor the same pressures apply.

If you’re a woman in this industry then your appearance is a significant concern. Venture out to the local shops without makeup, gain a few pounds over Christmas or forget to get that regrowth re-dyed and you can expect to find it reported. I don’t want that life. While you’re involved in a production you can expect to have restrictions placed on your weight range and your ability to make decisions about your own body. Did you know that actors are often legally prevented from restyling their hair!

As an actor you can expect the possibility of a longer working life, if you’re lucky enough to work, provided you continue to attract fans. Popularity is everything and the public are a fickle lot. Arguments about making movies with older women ignore the simple economic imperative that drives this industry. We’ll see more movies with older women when we watch that type of movie in droves. The excitement over the Marigold Hotel franchise was amusing to me. Older actors can actually draw a huge audience, even with their crows feet showing! Why did this surprise anyone? The baby boomers are still a huge audience and we are all at retirement age, or close to it.

If you’re an actor a big part of your job will be the tedium of memorising someone else’s words and the dubious art of pretending to be someone that you’re not. Because you are considered a ‘public figure’ people will be able to take your photo or film you whenever you step out your front door and they’ll be able to express their personal opinions about you in the media, no matter how offensive. If they lie about you there’s legal recourse, but it’s going to be expensive and you might lose fans in the process.

I don’t envy actors. And not envying them means I don’t particularly care what they do to maintain their appearance. I’m very glad that I’ve never worked in an industry where I had to be that obsessive about my face and body.

You can understand why I don’t think that the way these women look has anything to do with my body image or self esteem. I don’t want their lives. I have another issue with the claim that we’re all supposed to suffer under the pressure imposed by the way women are portrayed in the media; Our participation is optional. We are not required to watch TV or movies or to buy magazines. We don’t need to wear makeup every day, adhere to current fashions or spend a fortune on skin care. It’s all a choice. I’d certainly defend the right of any woman to make that choice but please don’t then complain about how you feel intimidated by all the beautiful people. You don’t need to watch any of it.

Cate Blanchett’s choices, and the speculation around them, are just gossip and really none of our business. If it pleases you to have cosmetic enhancement then go right ahead. If you’re feeling the pressure because someone famous has had it done then your money might be better spend talking to someone about why that person’s choices are having so much impact upon how you live your life.

 

My free Kindle promotion is now live.

If you’ve been waiting until my book was available on Kindle for free, now is your chance!

Please leave a review once you’ve read it. Thanks so much.

It will be free for the next three days to celebrate the anniversary of the mammogram that found my triple negative breast cancer four years ago. Four years! Giving the book away to anyone that needed it seemed like an appropriate way to acknowledge all of the love and support I have had, both during treatment and since it ended.

The early feedback on the book is great and I’ve already had a psychologist tell me that she plans on recommending it to her patients (even the ones that haven’t had cancer!). My goal now is the get this information into the hands of as many people as I can. If you can help by sharing this post, putting the link on Facebook or in any other way that would be fantastic!

My deep gratitude in advance.

Meg

Free From Fear: Living well after cancer

GREAT DEAL on my book, now also in paperback!

GREAT NEWS! To celebrate four years since my initial diagnosis I’ve asked Amazon to make the electronic version of my book available for FREE on the 19th, 20th and 21st of June 2017. If you didn’t want to pay for it, couldn’t afford it or know someone that would like it for free, please put this date in your diary and make sure you have Kindle on your device so you can download it and read it.

If you don’t already have it, you can get the Kindle reader software from Amazon for free and load it onto your laptop, smart phone or tablet.

In response to all the requests I’ve received, I’ve also now made the book available in paperback! Thanks for the challenge everyone. It turns out there’s a fair bit of technology to negotiate but I’m pretty happy with the result. I must admit I’m a book lover myself. There’s just something about holding it in your hands and turning the pages. I like to use little sticky notes to mark the bits that strike a chord and to flick back and forth from section to section. An ebook just isn’t the same.

As part of the celebration for my four years of living, I’ve also reduced the cost of the paperback to just $10 US for the whole of June 2017.

At these prices I’m not making any profit. As you know, that was never my goal. I want to get the book out to those that need it.

To those that asked if it’s going to be available in book stores, sadly, no. Independent publishing means they only print copies as they are ordered, which keeps the costs down. It would need to be picked up by a major publisher to be produced in the kinds of numbers that would get it out into bookshops, so it’s Amazon or nothing.

If you’re concerned about the safety of electronic transactions online I highly recommend Paypal. I used to be the head of fraud for the NSW Police so when I say this is your safest option you know I don’t say it lightly!

Please help me by spreading the word so that as many people as possible can be free of the fear of recurrence, and if you do get a copy and read it, please leave an honest review on the Amazon site. As we all know, the opinions of fellow survivors mean a lot to all of us.
Thanks in advance for all your support.
Love and gentle hugs
Meg

Book Reviews!

There’s something mildly terrifying about writing a book.

In the writing phase I was consumed with craft and content. I wanted it to be simple, but not too simple. Useful and not overwhelming. Helpful and not exhausting.

After completing the first draft I put it aside for several weeks, came back to it and was shocked by how much repetition and useless waffle it contained. I edited fiercely.

A couple of people read through the draft for me, including one very generous friend whose a professional writer. The feedback was good. It was time to publish. No reason not to just jump right in and do it. And yet it felt terrifying! It suddenly occurred to me that I was putting myself out there, open to whatever criticism people decided to hurl at me. I metaphorically chewed my nails as I waited for the book reviews to arrive.

First came the friends. How I love my friends! A couple of them found the time to post their comments on the Amazon site. Here’s what they said:

A very valuable resource for everyone, not only those that have had cancer. There is so much knowledge and information within this book for tools with working through freeing yourself from fear. I believe sometimes when we get caught in fear, there is fog, we don’t seem to acknowledge our own values and get lost in the mist. There is so much within this book that draws on many techniques for working through this and with a lovely sense of humour, it shows Meg McGowan has had the life experience to walk the talk. Thank you Meg McGowan.

And this:

If I could pay $5 to avert one hour of meaningless fear, would I spend it? “Of course!” I thought, and bought this book.
It turned out to be full of practical ideas that I can use straight away on myself and the fearful ones around me…thats everyone alive.
Holding hands with the fear-monster is a sweet image, and does it work?
Well, I tested it.
After reading the book I did a suitable amount of scary-monster hand-holding, then went though a list of scary phone calls, scary conversations, procrastinated tasks.
I’m unharmed, and the quality of my future is now better. You don’t need a life-threatening illness for this book to protect and nourish you.
As a bonus, dandelions will forever look more beautiful, after reading this book.

When I checked today I found two reviews from people I don’t know. How exciting! Here’s what they’ve said:

If a cancer diagnosis feels like too much to bear, you’ll find solid comfort here. The exercises are quick and easy to perform. Yet they are profound and will produce lasting results. McGowan’s book is filled with wisdom that can only have come from one intimately familiar with the traumatizing effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment. I strongly urge you to buy this book. You’ll be glad you did and will, like me, refer to it for years to come. This book is a rare find, and the author deserves praise.

And this:

This book ticks all the boxes for handling the fear of recurrence that is part of all cancer patients’ lives after diagnosis.
It is written clearly and cuts through all the fog that surrounds us when we feel overwhelmed.
As a breast cancer survivor, I think Free from Fear should be on everyone’s Important Items list.
It is an exceptional read from someone who has been there, and understands.

Over on the Breast Cancer Network Australia site I’m also getting some really great feedback. Time to exhale.

You see, the thing is, even if I now get negative responses, or even if I never sell another copy of the book, it’s all been worth it.

Maybe I should write another one 😀

Here’s the Australian link (Kindle only)
Free From Fear on Amazon.au

Here’s the US site where you can also get the paperback.
Free From Fear on Amazon

There’s a promotion coming up on the 19th of June when the Kindle version will be available for free for three days. I’m celebrating four years since that visit to Breastscreen found three triple negative tumours, so it seemed like a good way to celebrate.

Thanks so much to everyone for all of your support. I couldn’t have done it without you. ❤

Falling in Love Again

Cancer makes you question everything.

You realise your days are numbered. You realise your days have always been numbered and you’ve been ignoring that universal and obvious fact for most of your life. Oh sure, at some level you’ve known you were ultimately going to die, but it always seemed like an event that was so far away it didn’t register as important.

Then cancer.

Then the possibility that death might be closer than you think.

Suddenly, your life so far gets thrown into sharp focus. What have you done with it? What can you mark up as achievements? What dreams did you realise and what got lost along the way?

Perhaps the most important question of all finally occurs to you: Is this how you want to spend the rest of your life?

Some people are transformed by cancer. They walk away from boring jobs, leave abusive or uncaring partners or abandon a life they inherited rather than created. Some finally find the courage to take big risks. That might involve jumping out of a plane or finally having an honest conversation.

There’s not much about cancer you’d call wonderful, and yet…

It is wonderful to have the opportunity to take an honest inventory of your life so far, to acknowledge the achievements and the joys, to mark the disappointments and the failures. It’s very reassuring to be in a place where we understand that our lives have been very much like every other person’s life. The colours and the flavours of our experiences are different but the ebb and flow of joy and sorrow is common to all of us.

It’s an opportunity for deep conversations about what has been and what will be and how it will all be evaluated. My husband asked me, ‘Is there anything on your bucket list?’

I’m one of those people that’s found ways to do the things that were important to me as I went along. I don’t have a burning need to hang glide (did it), or parachute (not doing it). I can look back over the last 50 years and be proud of some of my achievements and embarrassed by some of my behaviour, just like everyone else. So this was the answer to my husband’s question.

“I’d like to fall in love again.”

It was a punch to the heart. He looked away. He sighed. He curled his lips in and waited, with that look he gets when he’s about to say something difficult. Then he said this.

“I can understand that. I ………..”

He hates it when I cut him off mid sentence but I really had to.

“Oh Sweetheart! I didn’t mean with someone else! I meant I’d really like to fall in love with YOU again!”

We’ve been together a long time. Like most couples, we’d settled into a routine where our patterns were well known and predictable. We were comfortable. We were both content. But faced with the sudden possibility that I might not be around much longer I’d taken to contemplating what really mattered to me. What really matters to me is connection, intimacy and love.

Stuff is just stuff. You buy it. You enjoy it for a while. Then you have to maintain it. You give it away. You buy more stuff. It will never make you happy.

Achievement is a little more rewarding but ultimately no less fleeting. Who will remember what I did during my working life? Or the art or the writing or anything else I produced? Most of us will not have any impact beyond our circle of friends, and perhaps some of the people they know.

But love? Ah, what is there that compares to it. It’s no surprise that research into human contentment keeps turning up intimacy and connection to others as the main precursors to a good life. There’s also our personal experience. Think back to the times in your life that brought you the greatest joy and they’re probably about love.

So how to fall in love again? With the same person?

I started with a New York Times article that’s become so well known it turns up in television shows (most recently Big Bang Theory). It reported on a piece of research where strangers asked each other a series of questions and many of them fell in love. Here’s the link:

The 36 questions that make you fall in love

We spent a few evenings working through these questions. It was fun. We had some great conversations and were surprised to find that we still had so much unknown territory to explore. I think part of the reason we fall in love is that the early stages of a relationship, when we are getting to know each other, are so fascinating. We are not just fascinated by our new friend, we recognise that they find us fascinating in return. Is there anything more attractive?

I started thinking that perhaps the reason the 36 questions worked so well was less to do with the content of the questions, and more to do with the process. When you’ve been married for a while you stop being fascinated with each other. You also stop having that experience of your partner finding you fascinating. Questions that give you the opportunity to get back there could be about almost anything.

I spent some time researching similar ideas. It turns out that there are a lot of lists that people have put together. Some of them are about building greater intimacy, having better sex, building commitment, having interesting conversations or just getting through a party where you don’t know anyone. Working on the basis that the process of setting aside time to ask each other questions and to listen to the answers was more important than the actual questions, I bought a few packs of blank playing cards and copied out anything even remotely interesting.

The challenge here was not to edit too savagely. As you’ll see from the 36 questions, something surprisingly inane might lead to a really great discussion. When it comes to your partner, you don’t know what you don’t know and you shouldn’t make assumptions.

I put the cards into a little decorative box that I picked up at the discount store. It’s now part of our lives for one of us to suggest that we ‘do cards’. About once a week we’ll sit in the family room and take turns drawing a card and answering the question on it. Sometimes we’ll both answer the same question and sometimes we’ll just stick to our own card. Sometimes we’ll get through several cards and sometimes a single card will prompt and entire conversation.

The cards help us to ask each other questions that would be difficult without a third party. Drawing a card that starts, “Do you think……….” allows for an open discussion, where asking the same question directly can get caught up in assumptions, hidden subtext and anxiety. There are definitely questions in this stack that would unnerve me if my husband had asked them directly (Where is he coming from with that? What’s the point of that question? Is he trying to tell me something?) but the card makes it neutral. And either of us is allowed to decline to answer. We just put the card on the bottom of the pack and draw another one.

It’s a fun game. The result is that we’re now connecting the way we did when we were first dating. My husband continues to surprise me with his wisdom, insight, humour and kindness. The cards provide me with the joy of his undivided attention, and an opportunity to talk deeply about things that really matter to us, rather than the functional conversations we have everyday.

At one point, Graham suggested marketing the cards. Proving that most great ideas have already occurred to someone else, I found a sight called The School of Life. Guess what they sell. Yep, cards with questions on them.

The Game of Life Shop

We’re not through my home made cards yet, and we could probably work through the pack a few times and have several different conversations, but when we’ve exhausted them I’ll be buying some of these.

As a consequence of spending time together, talking about a huge range of things and sharing our feelings and opinions, we’ve found that we feel closer than ever. This has carried over into other parts of our lives. We’re enjoying each other’s company and looking for events to share together. I’m remembering what it is that made me want to marry this man.

It’s also helping me to understand that, post surgery and without breasts, my body matters less to my husband than my mind and my heart. We will both get old. I’m hoping we both get really old! Our bodies will continue to be less attractive to anyone else. This has nothing to do with our deep connection to each other. We still love to touch and hold each other. We will never stop discovering things about each other. To the rest of the world we are just ordinary people, but to each other we are fascinating.

Have I fallen in love again?

What do you think.

 

 

 

 

A Day of Rest

I might be about to officially enter the ranks of ‘old person’. I’m going to write about something we used to do when I was young that doesn’t happen anymore. ‘In my day…..’

Please don’t misunderstand me. I’m generally not sentimental about the past. I think our species has come a long way in the last fifty or so years. We are, on the whole, less violent, more tolerant and more interested in family and community than we are in power or the accumulation of personal possessions.

But I miss Sundays.

When I was a kid the shops were closed on Sunday. Saturday was the day you went shopping. If you were fortunate enough to live in a country town you also spent a lot of time saying hello to other people, stopping for a polite chat with those that weren’t close friends, but were part of your community. A lot of people also relegated time on Saturdays to cleaning the house or mowing the lawn.

Sundays were for resting.

For those that were members of a church or other religious congregation, Sundays were a day of gathering and worship. For everyone else there were the secular traditions; a Sunday roast with immediate or extended family, a walk or a nap after lunch, a quiet corner with a good book and an early night so we were all well rested for the week to come.

I wonder to what extent the chronic stress, anxiety and depression that now plagues us can be traced to the introduction of Sunday trading. You can now shop seven days a week. Thanks to online shopping, you can now shop 24 hours a day.

Marketing has always played with human psychology. It’s designed to make us want what we didn’t know we wanted. Its primary weapons are greed and anxiety. It seeks to convince us that more stuff will make us happier, more attractive, more successful. Even though we know in our hearts that this is untrue, we buy anyway.

This week three things bubbled to the surface of my world. The first was a piece about two studies into human behaviour that have been running for around 70 years. They’ve been tracking participants since they were kids at college in the USA. They can now tell us what it is that leads to people declaring their lives successful and happy. It’s connection to other people. Imagine! Not wealth or power or fame. It’s all about the quality of your relationships with others.

The next bubble was an article about resilience. Researchers are recommending that all the techniques for dealing with trauma and stress are of little benefit to us if we don’t take time to rest and recharge. It’s the quality of our time out that makes the difference.

How interesting that both pieces of research seem to be stating the glaringly obvious.

The final bubble in this week’s mix was a tiny purple flower that appeared on Facebook. It allowed us to express our gratitude. In addition to indicating that we liked or loved something, or were amused, amazed or angered by it, we could show our gratitude. A few days after it was introduced it was gone. There’s a petition to bring it back. I loved it. So did a lot of other people.

The research into expressing gratitude shows us that doing it regularly is good for us. It helps us to be happier with what we have. It pushes back against the marketing onslaught and allows us to look around our existing environment and appreciate that, for most of us, we already have enough. Gratitude also reminds us that the things that matter most to us are our relationships with other people, the opportunities we have to connect with nature and fun we have when we take time out from work.

I wonder if there’s a group of highly paid psychologists somewhere, recommending the Facebook owners avoid anything that encourages people to express gratitude. It can’t be good for business. If we are focusing on what we have and the importance of relationships and experiences over things, we are surely much less likely to want to spend money on things we didn’t need in the first place. We might even decide to spend less time on Facebook.

For my part, I’m signing the petition to bring back the grateful flower, I’m continuing to limit Facebook to no more than an hour in the morning and I’m spending time each Sunday recording seven things I’m grateful for.

I’m also reinstating a commitment to Sunday as a day of rest. That might mean lunch on the verandah with good friends or just going for a relaxing walk with my husband. There will definitely be more reading and the occasional trip to the movies. I also want to spend more time sitting in the garden and just enjoying it, rather than planting, weeding and mulching. It’s not that I don’t enjoy the gardening. It’s that I want to stop and appreciate the outcome.

I hope this week you’ll find some time to rest and recover. Maybe it’s time to reflect on your achievements or the quality of your close relationships. Maybe it’s escaping into a book or a movie. Whatever you decide to do, know that you’re doing your mind, your body and your spirit a favour. Rest is undervalued. I think it’s time we turned that around.